The NRC Bell 412 ASRA safety system : a human factors perspective on lessons learned from an airborne incident

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/S0951-8320(01)00100-4
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TypeArticle
Journal titleReliability Engineering and Safety Systems
Volume75
Issue2
Pages273283; # of pages: 11
SubjectSafety systems; Hardovers; Fly-by-wire; Human factors; Pilot response; ASRA; Lessons learned; Helicopter flight controls
AbstractThe National Research Council (NRC) Bell 205 Airborne Simulator is a full authority fly-by-wire (FBW) research helicopter. On 24 May, 1996 this aircraft underwent a failure which drove all four flight control actuators to full extension shortly after engagement of the FBW system, with nearly catastrophic results. The sound design inherent in the original Bell 205 safety system allowed the safety pilot to override the FBW system and prevented the loss of aircraft and crew. This incident, however, led to the realization that the existing safety system configuration in the Bell 205 was only marginally acceptable, and that this same system would be inadequate for the next generation FBW aircraft, the NRC Bell 412 Advanced Systems Research Aircraft (ASRA). Experience gained from the Bell 205 incident, and historical experience, has driven the design process of the safety systems for ASRA, with a particular view toward the capabilities and limitations of the operators.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
AffiliationNRC Institute for Aerospace Research; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberFRL-2000-0010
NPARC number8930424
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Record identifiercb8c4294-785b-4eff-a12f-06e4221db71d
Record created2009-04-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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