¹H-NMR and mass spectrometric characterization of the metabolic response of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to long-term handling stress

Download
  1. Get@NRC: ¹H-NMR and mass spectrometric characterization of the metabolic response of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to long-term handling stress (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s11306-008-0144-0
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleMetabolomics
Volume5
Issue1
Pages123137; # of pages: 15
AbstractStressors of various kinds constantly affect fish both in the wild and in culture, examples being acute water temperature and quality changes, predation, handling, and confinement. Known physiological responses of fish to stress such as increases in plasma cortisol and glucose levels, are considered to be adaptive, allowing the animal to cope in the short term. Prolonged exposure to stressors however, has the potential to affect growth, immune function, and survival. Nonetheless, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the long-term stress response. We have investigated the metabolic response of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to long-term handling stress by analyzing fish plasma via 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ultra high performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (UPLC–MS), and comparing results with controls. Analysis of NMR data indicated a difference in the metabolic profiles of control and stressed fish after 1 week of stress with a maximum difference observed after 2 weeks. These differences were associated with stress-induced increases in phosphatidyl choline, lactate, carbohydrates, alanine, valine and trimethylamine- N-oxide, and decreases in low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein, and lipid. UPLCMS data showed differences at week 2, associated with another set of compounds, tentatively identified on the basis of their mass/charge. Overall the results provided a multi-faceted view of the response of fish to long-term handling stress, indicating that the metabolic disparity between the control and stress groups increased to week 2, but declined by weeks 3 and 4, and revealed several new molecular indicators of long-term stress.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Marine Biosciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number42805
1791
NPARC number3538299
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifiercc01d34f-e06d-4876-b34b-1c1f6c2c1c2f
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)