Neuroprotective Effects of GDNF-expressing Human Amniotic Fluid Cells

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Neuroprotective Effects of GDNF-expressing Human Amniotic Fluid Cells (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s12015-013-9484-x
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleStem Cell Reviews and Reports
ISSN1550-8943
Pages118; # of pages: 18
AbstractBrain injury continues to be one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. Despite decades of research, there is currently no pharmacologically effective treatment for preventing neuronal loss and repairing the brain. As a result, novel therapeutic approaches, such as cell-based therapies, are being actively pursued to repair tissue damage and restore neurological function after injury. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective potential of amniotic fluid (AF) single cell clones, engineered to secrete glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (AF-GDNF), both in vitro and in a surgically induced model of brain injury. Our results show that pre-treatment with GDNF significantly increases cell survival in cultures of AF cells or cortical neurons exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Since improving the efficacy of cell transplantation depends on enhanced graft cell survival, we investigated whether AF-GDNF cells seeded on polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds could enhance graft survival following implantation into the lesion cavity. Encouragingly, the AF-GDNF cells survived longer than control AF cells in serum-free conditions and continued to secrete GDNF both in vitro and following implantation into the injured motor cortex. AF-GDNF implantation in the acute period following injury was sufficient to activate the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway in host neural cells in the peri-lesion area, potentially boosting endogenous neuroprotective pathways. These results were complemented with promising trends in beam walk tasks in AF-GDNF/PGA animals during the 7 day timeframe. Further investigation is required to determine whether significant behavioural improvement can be achieved at a longer timeframe. © 2014 Crown Copyright as represented by: Danica Stanimirovic.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21270851
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifiercc25865a-99f9-4207-b63b-1ccdb17e155e
Record created2014-02-17
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)