Chemical contrast for imaging living systems: Molecular vibrations drive CARS microscopy

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1038/nchembio.525
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TypeArticle
Journal titleNature Chemical Biology
ISSN1552-4450
Volume7
Issue3
Pages137145; # of pages: 9
Subjectadipogenesis; cell labeling; cell organelle; coherent anti stokes raman scattering microscopy; environment; Hepatitis C virus; host pathogen interaction; imaging; life cycle; lipid metabolism; lipid storage; microscopy; molecule; nonhuman; priority journal; review; tissue; vibration; Cell Tracking; Contrast Media; Lipid Metabolism; Molecular Imaging; Spectrum Analysis, Raman; Vibration
AbstractCellular biomolecules contain unique molecular vibrations that can be visualized by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy without the need for labels. Here we review the application of CARS microscopy for label-free imaging of cells and tissues using the natural vibrational contrast that arises from biomolecules like lipids as well as for imaging of exogenously added probes or drugs. High-resolution CARS microscopy combined with multimodal imaging has allowed for dynamic monitoring of cellular processes such as lipid metabolism and storage, the movement of organelles, adipogenesis and host-pathogen interactions and can also be used to track molecules within cells and tissues. The CARS imaging modality provides a unique tool for biological chemists to elucidate the state of a cellular environment without perturbing it and to perceive the functional effects of added molecules. © 2011 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences (SIMS-ISSM)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21271377
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Record identifiercc4cc03c-1a9a-4b72-8dd5-8778423a888a
Record created2014-03-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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