Modelling the heat transfer and structural behavior of plain and FRP confined rectangular columns in fire

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TypeArticle
Proceedings titleProceedings of the 9th International Symposium of the Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Reinforcement for Reinforced Concrete Structures
Conference9th International Symposium of the Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Reinforcement for Reinforced Concrete Structures, July 13-15 2009, Sydney Australia
Subjectfire; analytical modelling; FRP; rectangular reinforced concrete; slender column
AbstractIn recent years, existing concrete structures in North America have reached a state where many of them can no longer safely resist the loads acting on them due to electo-chemical corrosion and to increased load requirements, among other factors. Fibre-reinforced polymers (FRP's) have demonstrated good performance in retrofitting and repairing these deteriorated concrete structures, through both research studies and field applications. However, because of a lack of available information and the perceived susceptibility of these systems in fire, an experimental and analytical study is being conducted on the fire performance of FRP's and FRP-strengthened concrete structural members. The ultimate goal of the study is to provide design recommendations and guidelines that can be suggested for these types of structural members. This paper presents the procedure used in developing a model for the heat transfer and structural analysis of rectangular FRP-strengthened reinforced concrete columns in numerical fire simulation models. Preliminary results and partial validation of the analytical model are presented.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21274084
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Record identifierce558743-b8d1-4611-980f-51c40b09dabe
Record created2015-02-12
Record modified2016-05-09
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