On the development of microstructures and residual stresses during laser cladding and post-heat treatments

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s10853-011-5854-4
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Materials Science
ISSN0022-2461
1573-4803
Volume47
Issue2
Pages779792; # of pages: 14
AbstractIn this article, laser cladding process with a blown powder feeding was used to deposit nickel-based IN-625 superalloy, cobalt-based hardfacing Stellite 6 alloy and high-vanadium CPM 10V tool steel onto a similar or dissimilar base material, respectively, to investigate the development and controllability of process-induced residual stresses in the clad and to analyse their correlation with microstructural evolutions of the clad and heat-affected zone (HAZ) during cladding and post-heat treatments. The residual stresses were evaluated using the hole-drilling method as per ASTM E837-95, whereas the microstructures were studied using X-ray diffractometer, optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. A particular attention was paid to combined effect of both clad and HAZ on the build-up of residual stresses in the clad. It is expected that the experimental results will form a useful addition to the existing knowledge with respect to the topic and, more significantly, to promote confidence on industrial applications of laser-clad IN-625, Stellite 6 and CPM 10V materials.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Industrial Materials Institute; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
Identifier5854
NPARC number21268384
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Record identifiercf47c013-4d3d-4101-9bcd-01bf7e580f40
Record created2013-07-08
Record modified2016-05-09
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