The role of residual stress in neutral pH stress corrosion cracking of pipeline steels. Part I: Pitting and cracking occurrence

Download
  1. Get@NRC: The role of residual stress in neutral pH stress corrosion cracking of pipeline steels. Part I: Pitting and cracking occurrence (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.actamat.2006.08.037
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleActa Materialia
Volume55
Issue1
Pages2942; # of pages: 14
SubjectCorrosion; Ferritic steels; Neutron diffraction; Residual stresses; Stress corrosion cracking
AbstractIn this investigation, tensile test specimens were fabricated with increasing levels of compressive and tensile residual stress on the surface and through the thickness of the specimen. These residual stresses were then measured by neutron diffraction at multiple points along the length and through the depth of the specimens. The specimens were then exposed to a neutral pH aqueous soil environment in combination with an applied cyclic stress for various lengths of time in order to initiate and propagate stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The formation of micro-pitting was found to occur preferentially in areas where the tensile residual stresses were the highest (approximately 300?MPa), while SCC initiation occurred with a 71% normalized frequency in areas where the surface residual stress was in the range 150-200?MPa. The difference between residual stress levels occurring at SCC locations versus pitting locations resulted from both the change of residual stress during cyclic stress application during SCC testing and the residual stress gradient in the depth direction.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Canadian Neutron Beam Centre
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12328883
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierd400ceba-a1c5-4d80-9cda-dad396dc4d0a
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)