A study of twinning in zirconium using neutron diffraction and polycrystalline modeling

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s11661-002-0142-1
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TypeArticle
Journal titleMetallurgical and Materials Transactions A
Volume33
Issue3
Pages757763; # of pages: 7
AbstractAn experimental study using neutron diffraction quantified the evolution of twinning in pure clock-rolled zirconium that was subsequently deformed under uniaxial compression. The clock rolling introduced an initial texture of approximately 5 times random, and the compression specimens were cut with their loading axes nearly parallel to the predominant c-axes direction. Seven specimens deformed to strains between ?2 and ?17 pct and an undeformed specimen (0 pct strain) were examined. The deformation was performed at an applied strain rate of 0.001/s at 77 K. Twin volume fractions were estimated from diffraction data. Changes in texture and twin volume fractions were compared to predictions from a visco-plastic self-consistent (VPSC) polycrystal model, which described both slip and twinning. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using neutron diffraction to track the evolution of twinning. These results help benchmark the polycrystalline model, validate the description of twinning, and potentially lead to a better understanding of its role in hardening.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Canadian Neutron Beam Centre
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12328357
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Record identifierd4978b0f-e280-47b6-8129-15ba06d7490e
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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