Hanle measurements of electrodeposited Fe/GaAs spin tunnel contacts

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1063/1.4869777
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Applied Physics
ISSN0021-8979
Volume115
Issue12
Article number123709
SubjectInterfaces (materials); Iron; Metallic films; Vacuum; Auger spectroscopy; Interfacial state; Magnetic oxides; Nucleation rate; Theoretical calculations; Tunnel contacts; X-ray photoelectrons; Electrodeposition
AbstractWe report spin transport in electrodeposited Fe/n-GaAs tunnel diodes via three-terminal Hanle measurements. For temperatures between 20K and 150K, the spin resistance was up to 20 times higher than expected from theoretical calculations and 1000 times larger compared to a vacuum-deposited counterpart. This higher spin resistance was correlated with a higher contact resistance, and a higher concentration of oxygen impurities in the electrodeposited Fe film and interface, as detected via x-ray photoelectron and Auger spectroscopies, and inferred from Fe film nucleation rates. These results can be explained via a small effective tunnel-contact area of 5%, but extra spin filtering via interfacial states or magnetic oxide layers cannot be ruled out. The spin diffusion times (8.5 ± 0.4ns to 1.8 ± 0.4ns, for 20K to 150K) extracted from Lorentzian fits were in good agreement with values obtained from earlier 4-terminal Hanle measurements (7.8 ± 0.4ns to 3.2 ± 0.4ns, for 25K to 77K), both 10 times slower than reported vacuum-deposited contacts.
Publication date
PublisherAIP Publishing
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; Information and Communication Technologies
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272897
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Record identifierd5b9f471-2f94-4835-85b3-dcd62618f842
Record created2014-12-03
Record modified2016-05-09
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