Carbon dioxide-induced crystallization in poly(L-lactic acid) and its effect on foam morphologies

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/pi.2910
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TypeArticle
Journal titlePolymer international
Volume59
Issue12
Pages17091718; # of pages: 10
SubjectCO2; Poly(L-lactic acid); Crystallization; Foam morphology
AbstractThe effect of carbon dioxide on the physical properties of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and on the formation of crystalline domains was investigated. The presence of CO2 in the matrix was found to induce crystallization in PLLA, with the crystallinity increasing with increasing CO2 pressure. The combination of saturation conditions and formation of crystalline domains was studied for its effect on the formation of porous morphologies in PLLA. Moreover, the effect of CO2 on PLLA properties and formation of porous structures was further exploited by first creating crystalline domains in samples using CO2 at various pressures ar 25C and then re-saturating the same samples with CO2 at a constant pressure of 2.8 MPa and 0C. This paper reports on the solubility of CO2 at 25 and 0C in PLLA, crystallization and subsequent effect on foam morphologies when processed using different saturation cycles. Unique and intriguing morphologies were obtained by specifically controlling the properties of PLLA.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number51994
NPARC number16474624
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Record identifierd65db456-0881-45f7-991f-de42d7dd0bcb
Record created2010-12-08
Record modified2016-05-10
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