Herschel observations of a potential core-forming clump: Perseus B1-E

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201117934
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TypeArticle
Journal titleAstronomy & Astrophysics
ISSN0004-6361
1432-0746
Volume540
Article numberA10
Subjectstars; formation; dust; extinction; Perseus B1-E
AbstractWe present continuum observations of the Perseus B1-E region from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. These Herschel data reveal a loose grouping of substructures at 160−500 μm not seen in previous submillimetre observations. We measure temperature and column density from these data and select the nine densest and coolest substructures for follow-up spectral line observations with the Green Bank Telescope. We find that the B1-E clump has a mass of ~100 M⊙ and appears to be gravitationally bound. Furthermore, of the nine substructures examined here, one substructure (B1-E2) appears to be itself bound. The substructures are typically less than a Jeans length from their nearest neighbour and thus, may interact on a timescale of ~1 Myr. We propose that B1-E may be forming a first generation of dense cores, which could provide important constraints on the initial conditions of prestellar core formation. Our results suggest that B1-E may be influenced by a strong, localized magnetic field, but further observations are still required.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21268983
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Record identifierd769ef23-911d-4982-b33d-10d196ce74b2
Record created2013-11-28
Record modified2016-05-09
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