Death rates of obligate anaerobes exposed to oxygen and the effect of media prereduction on cell viability

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1139/m84-034
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TypeArticle
Journal titleCanadian Journal of Microbiology
Volume30
Pages228235; # of pages: 8
AbstractStationary-phase cells of Methanospirillum hungatei GP1, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum ΔH, Methanobacterium bryantii M.o.H., Fusobacterium sp., Bacteroides fragilis, and Eubacterium limosum were aerated in medium devoid of cysteine – sodium sulfide (cysteine–Na2S) reducing agents to determine the death rates caused by exposure to oxygen. D values (time in minutes required to destroy 90% of the initially viable population) for these anaerobes were 208, 293, 543, 239, 410, and 507 min, respectively. Death was exponential throughout the treatment period for all the anaerobes, except B. fragilis and E. limosum which showed no significant death for the first 2 and 9 h of aeration, respectively. A minimum prereduction period of 6 h inside an anaerobic chamber was required for aerobically poured agar medium containing cysteine–Na2S to achieve maximum viable cell recovery of the nonmethanogens not previously exposed to air. The results also showed that agar medium containing reducing agents, poured anaerobically, and previously reduced in an anaerobic chamber for 24 h, could be plated aerobically and reintroduced into the anaerobic chamber within 60 min of inoculation without affecting viable cell recovery of the nonmethanogenic bacteria.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Biological Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NRC numberPATEL1984B
22887
NPARC number9369692
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Record identifierd81510fb-aa8d-45ad-91c6-8e73b8d82888
Record created2009-07-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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