Thermal plasma spraying for SOFCs: applications, potential advantages and challenges

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpowsour.2007.03.075
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Power Sources
Volume170
Issue2
Pages308323; # of pages: 16
SubjectSolid oxide fuel cells; Thermal plasma spraying; Nanopowder; Components; Integrated fabrication; Cost reduction
AbstractIn this article, the applications, potential advantages, and challenges of thermal plasma spray (PS) processing for nanopowder production and cell fabrication of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are reviewed. PS processing creates sufficiently high temperatures to melt all materials fed into the plasma. The heated material can either be quenched into oxide powders or deposited as coatings. This technique has been applied to directly deposit functional layers as well as nanopowder for SOFCs application. In particularly, low melting point and highly active electrodes can be directly fabricated on zirconia-based electrolytes. This is a simple processing technique that does not require the use of organic solvents, offering the opportunity for flexible adjustment of process parameters, and significant time saving in production of the cell and cost reduction compared with tape casting, screen printing and sintering processing steps. Most importantly, PS processing shows strong potential to enable the deposition of metal-supported SOFCs through the integrated fabrication of membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA) on porous metallic substrates with consecutive deposition steps. On the other hand, the application of PS processing to produce SOFCs faces some challenges, such as insufficient porosity of the electrodes, the difficulty of obtaining a thin (<10 μm) and dense electrolyte layer. Fed with H2 as the fuel gas and oxygen as the oxidant gas, the plasma sprayed cell reached high power densities of 770 mW cm−2 at 900 °C and 430 mW cm−2 at 800 °C at a cell voltage of 0.7 V.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number8901160
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Record identifierd86fdb73-de63-4635-a7e7-b40ee95f7bd9
Record created2009-04-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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