Fiber optic sensors for structural health monitoring of air platforms

  1. Get@NRC: Fiber optic sensors for structural health monitoring of air platforms (Opens in a new window)
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Journal titleSensors
Pages36873705; # of pages: 19
Subjectaircraft; economics; fiber optics; hospital service; human; instrumentation; mechanics; methodology; review; structure collapse; Aircraft; Fiber Optic Technology; Humans; Maintenance; Mechanical Phenomena; Structure Collapse
AbstractAircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided. © 2011 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Microstructural Sciences (IMS-ISM)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21271432
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Record identifierd8afb1d2-0506-4485-9156-c7cdedd1e60c
Record created2014-03-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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