Amplitude and polarization modulated hyperspectral Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

Download
  1. (PDF, 573 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: Amplitude and polarization modulated hyperspectral Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1364/OE.23.028119
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleOptics Express
ISSN1094-4087
Volume23
Issue22
Pages2811928131
AbstractWe present a simple hyperspectral Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy method based on spectral focusing of chirped femtosecond pulses, combined with amplitude (AM) and polarization (PM) modulation. This approach permits the imaging of low concentration components with reduced background signals, combined with good hyperspectral resolution and rapid spectral scanning. We demonstrate, using PM-SRS in a Raman loss configuration, the spectrally resolved detection of deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO-d6) at concentrations as low as 0.039 % (5.5 mM). In general, background signals due to cross-phase modulation (XPM), two-photon absorption (TPA) and thermal lensing (TL) can reduce the contrast in SRS microscopy. We show that the nonresonant background signal contributing to the SRS signal is, in our case, largely due to XPM. Polarization modulation of the Stokes beam eliminates the nonresonant XPM background, yielding high quality hyperspectral scans at low analyte concentration. The flexibility of our combined AM-PM approach, together with the use of variable modulation frequency and lock-in phase, should allow for optimization of SRS imaging in more complex samples.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationSecurity and Disruptive Technologies; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23000667
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierd8f1a30f-5c08-4293-838d-2f5effc63c72
Record created2016-08-19
Record modified2016-08-19
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)