Reaction of alkenes with hydrogen-terminated and photooxidized silicon surfaces. A comparison of thermal and photochemical processes

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1021/la060797t
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TypeArticle
Journal titleLangmuir
Volume22
Issue20
Pages83598365; # of pages: 7
AbstractReagentless micropatterning of hydrogen-terminated Si(111) via UV irradiation through a photomask has proven to be a convenient strategy for the preparation of ordered bicomponent monolayers. The success of this technique relies upon the differential rate of reaction of an alkene with the hydrogen-terminated and photooxidized regions of the surface. Monolayer formation can be accomplished under either thermal or photochemical conditions. It was observed that, after 3 h, reaction in neat alkene solution irradiation (Rayonet, 300 nm) afforded the expected patterned surface, while thermal conditions (150 °C) resulted in a partial loss of pattern fidelity. Monolayer properties and formation were studied on oxidized and hydrogen-terminated silicon under thermal and photochemical initiation, by contact angle, ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results show that alkenes add to silanol groups on the silica surface in a manner consistent with acid catalysis:  once attached to the surface, the silica oxidized the hydrocarbon.
Publication date
PublisherACS Publications
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21268137
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Record identifierda91e051-e999-4b23-860f-da4ac184c843
Record created2013-05-08
Record modified2016-05-09
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