Variation of ground snow loads with elevation in southern British Columbia

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TypeArticle
Journal titleCanadian Journal of Civil Engineering
ISSN0315-1468
Volume11
IssueSeptember 3
Pages480493; # of pages: 14
Subjectsnow loads; altitude; topographical profiles; climatic regions; water equivalent increase with elevation; climatic conditions; design ground snow load estimation; Snow and Ice loads; charge de neige; altitude; profil topographique; zone climatique
AbstractMeasurements conducted at 20 locations in Southern British Columbia were used to investigate the relationship between design ground snow load and elevation. It was found that the increase in water equivalent with elevation (i.e., the slope of the graph of water equivalent plotted against elevation) could be defined for regions having similar climatic conditions. For a given location, the design ground snow load can therefore be estimated by extrapolating from the water equivalent value at one elevation, where it has been measured, to the elevation at the location in question. Plots of the absolute values of water equivalents against elevation for regions of similar climatic conditions gave less satisfactory relationships but they could still be used to estimate approximate values of the design ground snow loads for any particular site.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierDBR-P-1217
NRC number23579
1941
NPARC number20377273
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Record identifierdb0b5042-f57b-41a9-9391-b94834f5c479
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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