Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and environmental challenges at the ultratrace level -- a review

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/S0584-8547(96)01661-8
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TypeArticle
ConferenceSecond European Furnace Symposium, May 26-30, 1996, St. Petersburg, Russia
ISSN0584-8547
Volume52
IssueJuly 30,
Pages14511457; # of pages: 7
AbstractSince its commercial introduction, the graphite furnace (GF) has enjoyed widespread use as a sensitive and selective ultratrace analytical technique. It possess several attributes which make it almost ideally suited for the various matrices encountered in the analysis of environmental materials. Although the instrumental technique has essentially matured in recent years, significant progress is continuing to be realized in the development of accessory hardware relating to sample introduction and processing. Since the GF can accommodate samples containing from 0% (vapours) to 100% (solids) dissolved solids content, sampling in all physical phases can be addressed using a variety of approaches. Additionally, complex chemical processing can be conveniently accomplished on-line, alleviating the need for extensive clean-room facilities while permitting information on element speciation to be obtained. Examples of conventional solution sample introduction, solid/slurry sampling and vapour generation techniques will be presented, as will sample preparation and separation and concentration strategies for both on- and off-line processing of environmental materials for ultratrace analysis.
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for National Measurement Standards; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number671
NPARC number8898226
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Record identifierdc35d93d-5909-48c6-b403-3af0ab7ca51f
Record created2009-04-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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