Interphase between nanoparticles and molten polymeric matrix: pressure-volume-temperature measurements

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1163/156855407780340359
AuthorSearch for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleComposite Interfaces
Volume14
Issue3
Pages229242; # of pages: 14
SubjectPVT; free volume; equation-of-state; interphase in PNC; nanocomposites; molecular mobility; solidification; interlayer spacing
AbstractThe pressure–volume–temperature (PVT) dependence of commercial polymers (viz. poly- ε-caprolactam, PA-6, polystyrene, PS, polypropylene, PP, and epoxy), and of nanocomposites based on these resins, was studied in the molten state. Incorporation of 2-wt% organoclay decreases the specific volume by about 1.0%. The Simha–Somcynsky (S–S) lattice-hole theory provided excellent description of the PVT behavior. Congruence between the theory and experiment yielded an explicit measure of the free volume. It has been found that in polymeric nanocomposites (PNC) the reduction of the free volume, Δh, correlated with the degree of clay dispersion (e.g. expressed as the interlayer spacing, d₀₀₁), or more precisely with total clay surface area accessible to macromolecules. The free volume reduction originates in adsorption and solidification of macromolecules on the high-energy clay surface – the phenomenon observed in the Surface Force Analyzer. The solidification offers consistent explanation for several reported puzzling behaviors of PNC.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Industrial Materials Institute
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number53669
NPARC number15826015
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Record identifierdc447b13-c881-4448-966f-008bdbceeb60
Record created2010-07-19
Record modified2016-05-09
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