Out from the Edges: Multi-site Videoconferencing as a Public Sphere in First Nations

Download
  1. (PDF, 300 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: Out from the Edges: Multi-site Videoconferencing as a Public Sphere in First Nations (Opens in a new window)
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Community Informatics
VolumeVolume: 5 (2)
AbstractThe paper examines multi-site videoconferencing in Northern Ontario as a public sphere. The theory of the public highlights the political effect of multi-site videoconferencing and how the technology contributes to the well-being of the community. To analyze the political effects of videoconferencing, the paper describes a case of the community use of multi-site videoconferencing based on video analysis and semi-structured interviews. The case occurred in 2007 and connected a number of First Nation communities across Canada for simultaneous audio-visual exchange. K-Net Services in Ontario hosted the meeting to gauge the feasibility of public meetings through videoconferencing and to document an example of community uses of the technology. K-Net Services works to develop their videoconferencing infrastructure as a public space. Our findings suggest K-Net’s activities have developed a media institution best understood as a counter-public sphere for their service region. The case meeting shows a potential new opportunity to further integrate videoconferencing into community development.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number14968153
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierdc5e4113-151f-411c-a026-56bb7328933f
Record created2010-06-10
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)