Development and Present State of German Periglacial Research in the Polar, Subpolar and Alpine Environment

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.4224/20337838
AuthorSearch for:
TypeTechnical Report
Series titleTechnical Translation, National Research Council Canada; Volume 1983
ISSN0077-5606
Physical description64 p.
SubjectPermafrost; Soils; geomorphology; research; polar regions; cold regions
AbstractAfter a short discussion of the term 'periglacial', for which in German two versions, "periglazial" and " periglaziar" coexist, the development of periglacial research as reflected in the German literature is outlined. This paper focuses on research activities in arctic, subarctic and alpine environments after the Second World War, a phase in which most attention has been devoted to alpine periglacial studies in various parts of the world. Regional studies rather than studies on specific periglacial phenomena prevail and show the geographical affiliations of German periglacial research. Traditionally a branch of descriptive climatic geomorphology research in actuoperiglacial environments, it has experienced a gradual shift towards more ecological approaches. This is reflected by an increasing consideration of the whole range of periglacial environmental factors and their complex interrelation. Research results in the field of periglacial climatic conditions and frozen ground, especially permafrost, are reviewed.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
IdentifierNRC-TT-1983
NRC number773
NPARC number20337838
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Record identifierdf584589-8d54-4847-8576-2def421ed7a5
Record created2012-07-19
Record modified2016-10-03
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