NMR shielding constants for hydrogen guest molecules in structure II clathrates

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1063/1.2000258
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TypeArticle
Journal titleThe Journal Of Chemical Physics
ISSN00219606
Volume123
Issue5
Pages051107-1051107-4; # of pages: 4
Subjectchemical shift; density functional theory; hydrogen neutral molecules; molecular configurations; proton magnetic resonance
AbstractProton NMR shielding constants and chemical shifts for hydrogen guests in small and large cages of structure II clathrates are calculated using density-functional theory and the gauge-invariant atomic-orbital method. Shielding constants are calculated at the B3LYP level with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The calculated chemical shifts are corrected with a linear regression to reproduce the experimental chemical shifts of a set of standard molecules. The calculated chemical shifts of single hydrogen molecules in the small and large structure II cages are 4.94 and 4.84 ppm, respectively, which show that within the error range of the method the H2 guest molecules in the small and large cages cannot be distinguished. Chemical shifts are also calculated for double occupancy of the hydrogen guests in small cages, and double, triple, and quadruple occupancy in large cages. Multiple occupancy changes the chemical shift of the hydrogen guests by approximately 0.2 ppm. The relative effects of other guest molecules and the cage on the chemical shift are studied for the cages with multiple occupancies.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedYes
Identifier10012680
NPARC number12329222
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Record identifierdfe4a736-609b-4a86-bb48-e2e2a067ed9d
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2017-03-23
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