Reduction in predicted survival times in cold water due to wind and waves

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2015.01.001
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TypeArticle
Journal titleApplied Ergonomics
ISSN0003-6870
Volume49
Pages1824; # of pages: 7
SubjectErgonomics; Calm conditions; Environmental conditions; Marine accidents; cold water; adult; body temperature; heat loss; immersion suit; oxygen consumption; protective clothing; survival time prediction; tsunami; water immersion; wind
AbstractRecent marine accidents have called into question the level of protection provided by immersion suits in real (harsh) life situations. Two immersion suit studies, one dry and the other with 500mL of water underneath the suit, were conducted in cold water with 10-12 males in each to test body heat loss under three environmental conditions: calm, as mandated for immersion suit certification, and two combinations of wind plus waves to simulate conditions typically found offshore. In both studies mean skin heat loss was higher in wind and waves vs. calm; deep body temperature and oxygen consumption were not different. Mean survival time predictions exceeded 36h for all conditions in the first study but were markedly less in the second in both calm and wind and waves. Immersion suit protection and consequential predicted survival times under realistic environmental conditions and with leakage are reduced relative to calm conditions.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; Ocean, Coastal and River Engineering
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberOCRE-PR-2015-005
NPARC number21275625
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Record identifierdfe5494b-b7c1-474f-83f9-0eb6d56f007b
Record created2015-07-14
Record modified2016-05-27
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