Isolation and characterization of genes encoding lipid transfer proteins in Linum usitatissimum

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s10535-016-0592-8
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TypeArticle
Journal titleBiologia Plantarum
ISSN0006-3134
1573-8264
Volume60
Issue2
Pages285291
SubjectFlax; Gene expression; Molecular cloning; Plant development; RT-qPCR
AbstractVery little is known about lipid transfer proteins from flax (Linum usitatissimum L.). In the present work, three genes encoding a lipid transfer protein (LTP) were isolated from flax, two of which encoded Type-1 and one Type-2 LTPs with molecular masses of about 9 and 7 kDa, respectively. The analysis of deduced amino acid sequence reveals that only Type 2 of the L. usitatissimum leaf specific LTP (LuLTP_Ls) had an N terminal signal peptide consisting of 23 amino acids. The phylogenetic analyses of LuLTP_Ls suggest their closest relatedness with respective proteins from Dimocarpus longan and Vitis vinifera. The gene expression analysis shows that LTP Type 1 genes, which include LuLTP_Ls1 and LuLTP_Ls3, were progressively expressed during leaf development, whereas LuLTP_Ls4 (Type 2) was expressed only at initial and terminal senescence stages of cotyledons. The results suggest that both types of LuLTP_Ls were differentially yet significantly expressed in cotyledons implicating their function in transport and scavenging lipidic skeletons for the benefit of other developing parts of the plant.
Publication date
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationAquatic and Crop Resource Development; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
Identifier592
NPARC number23000119
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Record identifiere03c18c1-d53e-44fc-a731-fdd6b067bf61
Record created2016-06-03
Record modified2016-06-03
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