Comparison between computed and field measured thermal parameters in an atrium building

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/S0360-1323(98)00007-9
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TypeArticle
Journal titleBuilding and Environment
Volume34
IssueMarch 2
Pages129138; # of pages: 10
SubjectSkylights; Atriums
AbstractThis paper presents a comparison study between simulation and filed measurements of thermal parameters of an atrium building in Ottawa, Canada. The selected atrium was an enclosed three-storey building with a pyramidal skylight. Thc atrium was fully conditioned and has open corridors at each storey connecting it to adjacent spaces. The atrium space was used for circulation and reception while adjacent spaces are offices and meeting rooms. The atrium was monitored in June 1995 and in December 1995 to consider extreme conditions of the outdoor climate. The simulation results were obtained using ESP-r computer program. The comparison included those af predicted and measured solar radiation entering the atrium space at the rooftop, and predicted and measured indoor temperatures of the atrium floors. Results for the solar radiation showed good agreement between the measured and predicted values. When the mechanical system was turned off, the predicted temperatures were within + 2oC of the measured temperatures in winter. In summer, however, the predicted temperatures were 2-3oC higher than the measured temperatures.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number41097
7771
NPARC number20338314
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Record identifiere03cfb93-8170-410b-8299-01179066d597
Record created2012-07-19
Record modified2016-05-09
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