Experimental investigation of soot formation characteristics on gasoline-diesel blend flames

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.16236/j.cnki.nrjxb.201502018
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TypeArticle
Journal titleNeiranji Xuebao/Transactions of CSICE (Chinese Society for Internal Combustion Engines)
ISSN1000-0909
Volume33
Issue2
Pages117122
SubjectDiesel; Gasoline; Liquid burner; Soot; Transmission electron microscope
AbstractStable laminar diffusion flames of different gasoline-diesel blends, namely G0, G20, G50, G80 and G100, were formed using a novel pre-vaporized liquid fuel burner system to investigate the soot formation characteristics in these flames. A two-dimensional line-of-sight attenuation technique was employed to acquire the twodimensional transmissivity images followed by an effective tomographic inversion algorithm for soot volume fraction distributions. Soot particles were also sampled using a rapid insertion probe for transmission electron microscope(TEM)image analysis to get soot morphology and primary particle size information. Test results show that, with the increase of gasoline to diesel, soot concentrations decrease to different levels at different heights, showing the stronger soot generation propensity of diesel. Soot particle sizes also decrease when more gasoline is added to diesel but primary soot particle diameters remain in the range from 14 nm, to 39, nm.
Publication date
PublisherChinese Society for Internal Combustion Engines
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; Energy, Mining and Environment
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23001014
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Record identifiere0693e18-952b-4003-ab3a-534daa89800c
Record created2016-11-29
Record modified2016-11-29
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