Directed self-assembly of single quantum dots for telecommunication wavelength optical devices

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/lpor.200810077
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TypeArticle
Journal titleLaser & Photonics Review
Volume4
Issue2
Pages283299; # of pages: 17
SubjectSite-selective epitaxy; quantum dots; single photon sources
AbstractThe ability to control the nucleation site of a single quantum dot will have a profound effect on the development of quantum dot-based photonic devices. The deterministic approach will provide a truly scalable technology that can take full advantage of conventional semiconductor processing for device fabrication. In this review, we discuss the progress towards the integration of deterministically nucleated single quantum dots with top-down quantum optical devices targeting telecommunication wavelengths. Advances in site-controlled quantum dot nucleation using selective-area epitaxy now makes it possible to position quantum dots at predetermined positions on a substrate in registry with alignment markers. This, in turn, has allowed for devices fabricated in subsequent processing steps to be aligned to individual quantum dots. The specific devices being targeted are gated-single dots and coupled dot-cavity systems which are key components of efficient sources of single photons and entangled photon pairs.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Microstructural Sciences
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number17176296
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Record identifiere0adb9f7-d73d-4e2d-bfcd-ffe86e01330a
Record created2011-03-26
Record modified2016-05-09
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