The emerging biofuel crop Camelina sativa retains a highly undifferentiated hexaploid genome structure

Download
  1. Get@NRC: The emerging biofuel crop Camelina sativa retains a highly undifferentiated hexaploid genome structure (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms4706
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleNature communications
ISSN2041-1723
Volume5
Article number3706
SubjectBiological sciences; Biotechnology; Genetics
AbstractCamelina sativa is an oilseed with desirable agronomic and oil-quality attributes for a viable industrial oil platform crop. Here we generate the first chromosome-scale high-quality reference genome sequence for C. sativa and annotated 89,418 protein-coding genes, representing a whole-genome triplication event relative to the crucifer model Arabidopsis thaliana. C. sativa represents the first crop species to be sequenced from lineage I of the Brassicaceae. The well-preserved hexaploid genome structure of C. sativa surprisingly mirrors those of economically important amphidiploid Brassica crop species from lineage II as well as wheat and cotton. The three genomes of C. sativa show no evidence of fractionation bias and limited expression-level bias, both characteristics commonly associated with polyploid evolution. The highly undifferentiated polyploid genome of C. sativa presents significant consequences for breeding and genetic manipulation of this industrial oil crop.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; Aquatic and Crop Resource Development
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberNRC-ACRD-55995
NPARC number21272458
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifiere0b33c4f-3343-4898-b17e-afca4f67dc50
Record created2014-11-28
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)