Evidence of in situ microbial activity and sulphidogenesis in perennially sub-0 °C and hypersaline sediments of a high Arctic permafrost spring

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Evidence of in situ microbial activity and sulphidogenesis in perennially sub-0 °C and hypersaline sediments of a high Arctic permafrost spring (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s00792-014-0703-4
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Proceedings titleExtremophiles
Conference10th International Conference on Extremophiles, Sept. 7-11, 2014, Saint Petersburg, Russia
ISSN1431-0651
Volume19
Issue1
AbstractThe lost hammer (LH) spring perennially discharges subzero hypersaline reducing brines through thick layers of permafrost and is the only known terrestrial methane seep in frozen settings on Earth. The present study aimed to identify active microbial communities that populate the sediments of the spring outlet, and verify whether such communities vary seasonally and spatially. Microcosm experiments revealed that the biological reduction of sulfur compounds (SR) with hydrogen (e.g., sulfate reduction) was potentially carried out under combined hypersaline and subzero conditions, down to −20 °C, the coldest temperature ever recorded for SR. Pyrosequencing analyses of both 16S rRNA (i.e., cDNA) and 16S rRNA genes (i.e., DNA) of sediments retrieved in late winter and summer indicated fairly stable bacterial and archaeal communities at the phylum level. Potentially active bacterial and archaeal communities were dominated by clades related to the T78 Chloroflexi group and Halobacteria species, respectively. The present study indicated that SR, hydrogenotrophy (possibly coupled to autotrophy), and short-chain alkane degradation (other than methane), most likely represent important, previously unaccounted for, metabolic processes carried out by LH microbial communities. Overall, the obtained findings provided additional evidence that the LH system hosts active communities of anaerobic, halophilic, and cryophilic microorganisms despite the extreme conditions in situ.
Publication date
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; Energy, Mining and Environment
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21275555
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifiere13f4e23-dd98-452b-9593-e194624e0d61
Record created2015-07-14
Record modified2016-11-25
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)