Effect of past delivery practices on current conditions of cast-iron water pipes

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)IS.1943-555X.0000160
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Infrastructure Systems
ISSN1076-0342
Volume20
Issue1
Article number4013011
AbstractCast-iron pipes installed between 1850 and the early 1960s in North America, United Kingdom, and European countries were produced in foundries located near growing urban centers. Their considerable weight, size (especially larger-diameter pipes), and limited transportation facilities made their handling and delivery to the installation site difficult. Historical anecdotal evidence exists to suggest that some cast-iron pipes may have been damaged during delivery. This paper examines different mechanical models to examine what specific conditions may have led to pipe damage during delivery and installation. Analyses show that if pipes did incur damage, then cracks were likely to have occurred on the inside of the pipe bell or spigot ends. Furthermore, it appears that the spigot ends of smaller-diameter pipes had higher risk of damage during delivery, whereas both bell and spigot ends faced increased risk of damage in larger-diameter pipes. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to account for uncertainties in the parameters that were used in the different models. © 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Research in Construction (IRC-IRC)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272125
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Record identifiere24733ed-554d-4539-9437-1b779d360929
Record created2014-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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