Solubility of cholesterol in lipid membranes and the formation of immiscible cholesterol plaques at high cholesterol concentrations

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1039/c3sm50700a
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TypeArticle
Journal titleSoft Matter
ISSN1744-683X
Volume9
Issue39
Pages93429351; # of pages: 10
SubjectBi-layer; Cholesterol molecules; Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine; High cholesterols; Lipid membranes; Monoclinic structures; Out-of-plane; Triclinic structures; Lipid bilayers; Molecules; X ray diffraction; Cholesterol
AbstractThe molecular in-plane and out-of-plane structure of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes containing up to 60 mol% of cholesterol was studied using X-ray diffraction. Up to 37.5 mol% cholesterol could be dissolved in the membranes, resulting in a disordered lateral membrane structure. Highly ordered cholesterol structures were observed at cholesterol concentrations of more than 40 mol% cholesterol. These structures were characterized as immiscible cholesterol plaques, i.e., bilayers of cholesterol molecules coexisting with the lipid bilayer. The cholesterol molecules were found to form a monoclinic structure at 40 mol% cholesterol, which transformed into a triclinic arrangement at the highest concentration of 60 mol%. Monoclinic and triclinic structures were found to coexist at cholesterol concentrations between 50 and 55 mol%. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC-CCFN)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21269615
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Record identifiere3083277-ccd8-427f-abe1-ef2f9cf265f5
Record created2013-12-13
Record modified2016-05-09
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