A modelling approach to evaluate the long-term effect of soil texture on spring wheat productivity under a rain-fed condition

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1038/srep05736
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TypeArticle
Journal titleScientific Reports
ISSN2045-2322
Volume4
Article number5736
Pages110; # of pages: 10
AbstractSoil surface texture is an important environmental factor that influences crop productivity because of its direct effect on soil water and complex interactions with other environmental factors. Using 30-year data, an agricultural system model (DSSAT-CERES-Wheat) was calibrated and validated. After validation, the modelled yield and water use (WU) of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) from two soil textures (silt loam and clay) under rain-fed condition were analyzed. Regression analysis showed that wheat grown in silt loam soil is more sensitive to WU than wheat grown in clay soil, indicating that the wheat grown in clay soil has higher drought tolerance than that grown in silt loam. Yield variation can be explained by WU other than by precipitation use (PU). These results demonstrated that the DSSAT-CERES-Wheat model can be used to evaluate the WU of different soil textures and assess the feasibility of wheat production under various conditions. These outcomes can improve our understanding of the long-term effect of soil texture on spring wheat productivity in rain-fed condition.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationAquatic and Crop Resource Development; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272904
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Record identifiere36fd5b5-a6ba-4761-84b4-f7a858a83c1e
Record created2014-12-03
Record modified2016-05-09
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