Solar ultraviolet radiation on horizontal, South/45 degrees and south/vertical surfaces

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AuthorSearch for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleDurability of Building Materials
ISSN0167-3890
Volume2
Issue1
Pages1726; # of pages: 10
Subjectsolar radiation; weathering tests; polymeric materials; weatherability; seasons; monthly variation; seasonal distribution; median and maximum daily uv radiation; uv content of global solar radiation; uv degradation; accelerated weathering test; Plastics
AbstractThe weatherablity of plastic-based materials depends on the exposure angle. To help clarify the contribution of solar " ultraviolet" to this angular dependence, UV radiation incident on surfaces at horizontal (H) position and facing south at 45 degrees (S/45) and 90 degrees (S/V), at Ottawa, Canada, was measured continuously for one year. For materials in which UV plays a dominant role in degradation, the S/45 exposure results in 5 - 13% less degradation than the H exposure, while the S/V exposure results in 37 - 54% less than the H exposure. The proportion of UV in solar radiation increases with a decrease in daily global solar radiation. This relation can be used to estimate the UV radiation at various sites from global solar radiation readings. Median and maximum daily UV levels for each month were determined, to aid development of an accelerated weathering test.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierDBR-P-1157
NRC number22919
2108
NPARC number20374384
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Record identifiere4278690-17f2-481d-96ae-0c788329ba67
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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