Prediction of burst pressure using a decoupled ductile fracture criterion for tube hydroforming of aerospace alloys

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1063/1.3589532
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Proceedings titleTHE 14TH INTERNATIONAL ESAFORM CONFERENCE ON MATERIAL FORMING: ESAFORM 2011
Series titleAIP Conference Proceedings; no. 1353
ConferenceTHE 14TH INTERNATIONAL ESAFORM CONFERENCE ON MATERIAL FORMING: ESAFORM 2011, 27–29 April 2011, Belfast, United Kingdom
ISSN0094-243X
1551-7616
ISBN978-0-7354-0911-8
Pages301306; # of pages: 6
AbstractOne of the failure modes in tube hydroforming (THF) is bursting. To predict the burst pressure in the THF process, Brozzo's decoupled ductile fracture criterion was used in conjunction with a dynamic nonlinear commercial finite element software, Ls-Dyna, and the criterion was evaluated using the data obtained from the free expansion (tube bulging) tests performed on 0.9 mm and 1.2 mm thick stainless steel (SS) 321 tubes. The predicted burst pressures were compared with the experimental results for both thicknesses. The predicted burst failure of the tube bulging, based on the Brozzo's criterion, demonstrated a good agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the present approach for predicting the burst failure for the tube bulging can be extended to predict formability limits in THF applications. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Aerospace Research
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272014
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Record identifiere44197c7-bc25-4c65-96a8-32e49c697798
Record created2014-05-21
Record modified2016-05-09
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