Mammalian Cell Surface Imaging with Nitrile-Functionalized Nanoprobes: Biophysical Characterization of Aggregation and Polarization Anisotropy in SERS Imaging

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1021/ja0670005
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of the American Chemical Society
ISSN0002-7863
Volume129
Issue1
Pages1415; # of pages: 2
AbstractFunctionalized silver nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized with a cyano probe and utilized to label the surface of HeLa cells expressing a recombinant transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor. Optical imaging, high-resolution Raman imaging, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect at the cell membrane. Different assemblies of NPs resulted in markedly different enhancement. We validated the necessity of NP aggregates and polarization dependency for optimal contrast enhancement in SERS cellular imaging. We demonstrated the ability to image membrane proteins on cells using a cyano-labeled SERS probe. Observed SERS hot-sites correlate well with small aggregated NPs. Furthermore, the strongest SERS signals result from aggregates oriented in the appropriate direction with respect to the incident laser polarization. These observations are critical for designing future molecular imaging agents for SERS imaging of cells and tissues.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences; NRC Institute for Microstructural Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
Identifier10072378
NPARC number12327584
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Record identifiere6919941-bd31-4d61-8191-8770608fd597
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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