Numerical and experimental study of the influence of C02 and N2 dilution on soot formation in laminar coflow C2H4/Air diffusion flames at pressures between 5 and 20 atm

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.combustflame.2015.01.020
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TypeArticle
Journal titleCombustion and Flame
ISSN0010-2180
Volume162
Pages22312247; # of pages: 17
Subjectsoot formation; laminar diffusion flame; pressure effect; C02 chemical effect
AbstractThe effects of fuel dilution by C02 and N2 on soot formation and the flame structure in laminar coflow C2HJair diffusion flames at pressures between 5 and 20 atm were investigated both experimentally and numerically. Experimentally a constant ethylene flow rate and a constant dilution rate of 1:2 (fuel:diluent by mass) were maintained throughout the experiments. The flames were stable and non-smoking over the pressure range investigated. The radially­ resolved soot volume fraction and temperature distributions were measured by the spectral soot emission (SSE) technique. Numerical calculations were conducted using two C2 chemistry models with formation of PAHs up to pyrene and a soot model incorporating pyrene collision as the soot inception step and hydrogen-abstraction acetylene addition mechanism and PAH condensation as the surface growth processes.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationMeasurement Science and Standards; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21274920
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Record identifiere846d34f-6021-4b8c-85cc-4f9126a366f6
Record created2015-04-29
Record modified2016-05-09
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