Modeling the atomic structure of very high-density amorphous ice

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.72.012201
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TypeArticle
Journal titlePhysical review B: Condensed Matter and Materials Physics
Volume72
Article number012201
Pages012201-1012201-4; # of pages: 4
AbstractThe structure of very high-density amorphous (VHDA) ice has been modeled by positionally disordering three crystalline phases, namely ice IV, VI, and XII. These phases were chosen because only they are stable or metastable in the region of the ice phase diagram where VHDA ice is formed, and their densities are comparable to that of VHDA ice. An excellent fit to the medium range of the experimentally observed pair-correlation function g(r) of VHDA ice was obtained by introducing disorder into the positions of the H₂O molecules, as well as small amounts of molecular rotational disorder, disorder in the O—H bond lengths and disorder in the H—O—H bond angles. The low-k behavior of the experimental structure factor, S(k) , is also very well reproduced by this disordered-crystal model. The fraction of each phase present in the best-fit disordered model is very close to that observed in the probable crystallization products of VHDA ice. In particular, only negligible amounts of ice IV are predicted, in accordance with the experimental observation.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12339146
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Record identifiere85c7b29-1504-4845-8be3-d0b73e741d3e
Record created2009-09-11
Record modified2016-05-09
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