Femtosecond laser-induced long-range self-organized periodic planar nanocracks for applications in biophotonics

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1117/12.699157
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TypeArticle
Proceedings titlePhoton Processing in Microelectronics and Photonics VI
SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering. Proceedings
ConferencePhoton Processing in Microelectronics and Photonics VI, January 22-25, 2007, San Jose, CA, USA
ISSN0277-786X
ISBN0819465712
9780819465719
Volume6458
Article number64581B
SubjectLab on a chip; Laser material processing; Laser micromachining; Nanoporous capillaries; Periodic nanostructures; Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS); Capillarity; Etching; Fused silica; Glass; Light polarization; Microfluidics; Raman scattering; Ultrashort pulses; Nanostructured materials
AbstractWith the proper choice of laser parameters focused femtosecond laser light creates long-range self-assembled planar nanocracks inside and on the surface of fused silica glass. The orientation of the crack planes is normal to the laser polarization direction and can be precisely controlled. The arrays of cracks when properly oriented and combined with chemical etching produce high aspect ratio micro- and nanofluidic channels. Direct femtosecond laser writing without any chemical etching can be used to fabricate embedded nanoporous capillaries in bulk fused silica for biofiltering and electrophoresis applications. The morphology of the porous structures critically depends on the laser polarization and pulse energy and can be used to control the transmission rates of fluids through the capillaries. Finally high aspect ratio, polarization-dependent, self-ordered periodic nanoslots can be fabricated from nanocracks produced on the surface of fused silica wafers. Control of the surface slot width from 10 to 60 nm is achieved through selective chemical etching. This technique, which may be useful for Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) applications, has sub-diffraction limited resolution and features high throughput writing over centimeters.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21276250
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Record identifiereadd815b-b332-48ab-a3e5-6447f4dacf0a
Record created2015-09-28
Record modified2017-04-24
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