Infrared technique as a research tool for measuring water vapor transmission of roofing membranes

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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Testing and Evaluation
ISSN0090-3973
Volume21
Issue3
Pages199210; # of pages: 12
SubjectRoofing; dry cup method; electronic instrument; infrared (ir) sensor; mylar film; permeance; roofing membranes; water vapor transmission (wvt); water vapor transmission rate (wvtr); wet cup method; Moisture performance; Couvertures
AbstractMeasurements of the permeability to water vapor of materials intended to prevent its transmission are time-consuming with the usual cup method. Several instruments have been promoted as being capable of providing results rapidly, but doubts about their agreement with cup measurements have delayed their use for more than quality control. One instrument with an infrared sensor was studied to investigate its accuracy and to correlate results obtained with the standard cup methods. Factors studied include those that contribute to the inconsistent performance of the instrument, especially for research work. Techniques for improving the precision and the accuracy of the instrument are discussed. The permeances of roofing papers and felts and of plastic films by both the modified IR instrument and the cup methods are reported and compared to values given in the literature.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
NoteReprinted in Building Envelope Performance and Durability : IRC technical seminar (NRCC-38991)
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierIRC-P-2099
NRC number35131
2324
NPARC number20374245
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Record identifiereb6ac3da-cb89-42ca-9939-616a5a331cfc
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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