Low temperature Si growth on Si(001): impurity incorporation and limiting thickness for epitaxy

Download
  1. (PDF, 526 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: Low temperature Si growth on Si(001): impurity incorporation and limiting thickness for epitaxy (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1116/1.1650852
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Vacuum Science and Technology B
Volume22
Issue3
Pages14791483; # of pages: 5
Subjectepitaxy; surface impurity levels; thin film growth; activation energies; chemical analysis
AbstractWe present a structural and chemical analysis of high-vacuum deposited Si filmsgrown on clean or oxidized Si (001) wafers by low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy. For growth on clean Si, we observed a limiting thickness for epitaxy that decreases with decreasing temperature with an activation energy of 0.47 eV. The onset of defect formation is correlated to a peak in the H impurity concentration. The transition to an amorphous phase is, however, observed beyond the depth where impurities are first observed pointing to surface disorder/roughening as a source of epitaxy breakdown. The O and C content in these films remains low until the film crystallinity has strongly deteriorated and reaches a saturation concentration of 2–4 at. % in the fully amorphous regions. The impurity profiles in amorphous-Si filmsgrown on oxidized Si are similar to those obtained on clean Si when grown at the same temperature and indicate that the impurity uptake depends primarily on residual gas and surface condition. Raman scattering results show the structural changes and evolution of the Si bond configuration.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Microstructural Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12743831
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifieree2650dc-a26d-49c6-942d-7594595af7e0
Record created2009-10-27
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)