A limit equilibrium analysis of progressive failure in the stability of slopes

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TypeArticle
Journal titleCanadian Geotechnical Journal
ISSN0008-3674
Volume15
Issue1
Pages113122; # of pages: 10
Subjectfailure (deficiency); slope; equilibrium method
AbstractA limit equilibrium method of analysis is proposed for the study of progressive failure in slope stability under a long- term condition. Based on effective stresses, the formulation of the method is derived from consideration of force and moment equilibrium within the soil mass above a prospective slip surface. By dividing the soil mass into a number of vertical slices, recognition of local failure can be made. Once local failure takes place, post-peak strength is assumed to be operative. This then initiates a redistribution of interslice forces and leads to some further local failure. Thus realistic available strengths along the slip surface can be evaluated. This permits the definition of a final safety factor, which is expressed in terms of the actual available reserve of strength. The proposed method has been applied to three well documented case records and encouraging results have been obtained. Based on the assumption that post-peak strengths are given by a friction angle equal to the peak value and a zero cohesion, stability charts have been prepared for design purposes.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierDBR-P-751
NRC number16436
2838
NPARC number20374329
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Record identifieree796b24-26f3-4349-beef-3b5dd18a6546
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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