Durability of concrete structures: prevention, evaluation, inspection, repair and prediction

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TypeArticle
Journal titleCanadian Civil Engineer
Volume21
IssueMay 2
Pages45, 19
SubjectConcrete
AbstractConcrete is the primary construction and repair material of many structural systems in Canada, such as highway bridges, high-rise buildings, parking structures, and dams. Today, many of the concrete structures, which have been exposed to aggressive environments, suffer from durability problems and fail to fulfill their design service life requirements. The problem is particularly serious in reinforced concrete structures where corrosion of reinforcing steel can impair their safety. Carbonation and chloride-induced corrosion are two major causes of deterioration of concrete structures in Canada and several other countries. The cost of the repair and rehabilitation of corrosion-damaged structures in the United States, Canada, and most European countries constitutes a large portion of their infrastructure expenditures. The limited knowledge of the field performance of corrosion-damaged structures and the lack of systematic approaches for their inspection, maintenance and repair contribute to the increase of their life-cycle costs, and result in the loss of functionality and safety.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
NoteAussi disponible en français: Durabilité des structures en béton: prévention, évaluation, inspection, réparation et prédiction
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number46624
16128
NPARC number20378078
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Record identifierefa4b16f-5413-4d1e-9792-d591cda5cd7b
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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