Enhanced terahertz transmission through bullseye plasmonics lenses fabricated using micromilling techniques

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s11468-015-0152-7
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TypeArticle
Journal titlePlasmonics
ISSN1557-1955
Subjectterahertz; plasmonic lens; bullseye; microfabrication; enhanced transmission
AbstractImaging applications at terahertz frequencies are, in general, limited to relatively low spatial resolution due to the effects of diffraction. By using a subwavelength aperture in the near-field, however, it is possible to achieve subwavelength resolution, although low transmission through the aperture limits the sensitivity of this approach. Plasmonic lenses in the form of bullseye structures, which consist of a circular subwavelength aperture surrounded by concentric periodic corrugations, have demonstrated enhanced transmission, thereby increasing the utility of near-field imaging configurations. In this paper, the design, fabrication, and experimental performance of plasmonic lenses optimized for 300 GHz are discussed. While nanofabrication techniques are required for optical applications, microfabrication techniques are sufficient for terahertz applications. The process flow for fabricating a double-sided bullseye structure using a precision micromilling technique is described. Transmission and beam profile measurements using a customized terahertz testbed are presented.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationAutomotive and Surface Transportation; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21277263
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Record identifierf1db54cc-4523-433e-b903-20384f8da672
Record created2016-01-28
Record modified2016-05-09
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