Structure and interactions in the anomalous swelling regime of phospholipid bilayers

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1021/la026052e
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TypeArticle
Journal titleLangmuir
ISSN0743-7463
Volume19
Issue5
Pages17161722; # of pages: 7
AbstractWe have carried out X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments, as a function of temperature, on fully hydrated samples of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers. The data show the following: (a) In the vicinity of the L to P' transition, we find an anomalous expansion of the water layer of ~1.7 ?. (b) The lipid bilayer thickness increases quasi-linearly and is similar to the increase in the lamellar repeat spacing d found in dimyristoyl ethanolamine bilayers in the temperature range of TM to TM + 13 C. (c) In contrast to an earlier study, we find no significant changes to the steric size of the phosphatidylcholine headgroup. The anomalous increase in d is thus dominated by an expansion of the water layer. This expansion is caused by a distinct increase in bilayer fluctuations as revealed by an analysis of the Caill? parameter. Additional osmotic pressure experiments not only support this notion but have allowed us to further estimate the temperature dependence of both the bilayer bending rigidity, Kc, and the interbilayer compressional parameter, B. Both Kc and B experience an abrupt decrease on approaching TM from above, indicative of a "softening" of the bilayers.
Publication date
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedYes
Identifier10367391
NPARC number12327338
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Record identifierf250b478-5ff0-4b72-8aa4-47a3c768b495
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2017-03-26
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