Raman and transmission electron microscopy study of disordered silicon grown by molecular beam epitaxy

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1116/1.1676345
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Vacuum Science and Technology A
Volume22
Issue3
Pages943947; # of pages: 5
Subjectamorphous semiconductonrs; thin films; epitaxy; silicon; molecular beam epitaxy
AbstractSiliconfilms were deposited by molecular beam epitaxy onto crystalline silicon(c-Si) and native oxide on c-Si (001) substrates at temperatures ranging from 98 to 572 °C. Raman spectroscopy of these films showed that both the short-range disorder and intermediate-range disorder decreases as the deposition temperature increases. The onset of a phase transition in the amorphous Si films can be effectively identified by the appearance of the polycrystalline and crystalline Si Raman bands, which allowed quantification of the crystalline volume fractions present. Both the transmission electron microscopy and Raman results confirmed that filmsgrown on the amorphous substrates at temperatures less than 414 °C are entirely amorphous, but exhibit c-Si features at higher temperatures. Filmsgrown on c-Si substrates exhibit a characteristic limiting thickness for epitaxy and the transformation of the resulting upper amorphous layer into crystalline form takes place at a much lower temperature (∼290 °C) than for the amorphous substrates.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Microstructural Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12744851
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Record identifierf2d5549f-6c55-4f41-a716-713f9f6e44e0
Record created2009-10-27
Record modified2016-05-09
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