The establishment of high DC shunt calibration system at KRISS and comparison with NRC

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1109/TIM.2015.2399022
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleIEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement
ISSN0018-9456
1557-9662
Volume64
Issue6
Pages13641368
Subjectshunts; calibration; current measurement; current supplies; current transformers; electrical resistance measurement
AbstractThe application of a binary step-up method has been investigated at the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) for establishment of high dc standards based on the calibration system of high dc shunts up to a few thousand amperes in which the current dependence of the shunt resistance can be measured. A successive step-up method with a pair of high dc shunts was suggested to link the unknown high current to the values of low current level which are already known. The step-up approach was further modified with employing a current monitor to extract the information on the current dependence of the shunt and the source current changes during the step-up measurement. To validate the modified step-up technology, a comparison of high dc shunt resistance was carried out with National Research Council (NRC) in which both the KRISS and the NRC results agreed well within the standard deviation of the measurement on the order of about 0.01%.
Publication date
PublisherIEEE
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationMeasurement Science and Standards; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23001680
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Record identifierf2fb0554-49a2-4e7d-a235-1ea1b76e4172
Record created2017-03-17
Record modified2017-03-17
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