Air infiltration and internal pressures in tall buildings

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ConferenceSecond Century of the Skyscraper : 3rd International Conference of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat: 1986-01, Chicago, Ill., USA
Pages689695; # of pages: 7
Subjectair infiltration; wind loads; openings; windows; distributed leakage; flow resistance; computer model; 56 story building; exterior walls; net pressures; internal pressure coefficients; opening area effect; Air flow/Wind pressure
AbstractWind increases the external pressure on windward walls, and decreases it on side and leeward walls. The walls have leakage paths through which air flows either in or out, depending on whether the internal pressure is lower or higher than the external pressure. Internal pressure adjusts to make inflow equal outflow, and depend on the size and location of large openings as well as the "background" leakage and the external pressure distribution. A program, originally written to compute air infiltration, was used to predict the internal pressure for a 56-story building. The analysis showed that the addition of a single opening the size of a typical window may cause as much as a 60 percent increase in the time-averaged maximum cladding pressure, by transferring load from the leeward and side walls to the windward wall.
Publication date
PublisherVan Nostrand Reinhold, New York, Publ.
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number30235
NPARC number20378830
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Record identifierf32bff67-09fb-47e8-9719-af193c4ec113
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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