Melt-layer thickness measurements during crushing experiments on fresh-water ice

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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Glaciology
Volume40
Issue134
Pages119124; # of pages: 6
Subjectice crushing; melt-layer
AbstractA stainless-steel platen with a centrally located pressure sensor on the front face, has been used to crush mono-crystalline, bubble-free fresh water ice samples. Two electrical conductors, located on the face of the pressure sensor, were connected to a bridge circuit so that the presence of liquid between the two conductors could be detected and its thickness measured. Video records of the ice/steel contact zone during crushing were obtained by mounting samples on a thick Plexiglass plate which permitted viewing through the specimen to the ice-steel interface. Total load and pressure records exhibited a sawtooth pattern due to the compliance of the ice and the testing apparatus, and spalling of ice from the contact zone. When the region of contact was in the vicinity of the pressure transducer, liquid was detected and peaks occurred in the liquid sensor output when load drops occurred. Contact between the platen and the ice consisted of low pressure zones of highly damaged crushed and/or refrozen ice, opaque in appearance, and transparent, high-pressure regions of relatively undamaged ice. Upper limits for the liquid-layer thickness on the high-pressure regions of relatively undamaged ice. Upper limits for the liquid-layer thickness on the high-pressure undamaged ice were ~3µm on the sharp descending sides.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Ocean Technology; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierIR-1995-26
NRC number5790
NPARC number8895677
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Record identifierf4c7c483-a4ba-4e0e-bcbf-bb9508255a06
Record created2009-04-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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