Isotopic quantum effects on the structure of low density amorphous ice

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1088/0953-8984/15/22/301
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal Of Physics. Condensed Matter
ISSN09538984
Volume15
Issue22
Pages36573664; # of pages: 8
AbstractCareful neutron diffraction measurements on deuterated low density amorphous (LDA) ice confirm that at 120 K it can be considered a fully 'annealed' structure, as no significant changes are observed in the amorphous spectra until crystallization occurred over time at 130 K. On this basis, the measurement of structural differences between the hydrogenated and deuterated forms of LDA ice at 120 K, have been carried out using 98 keV electromagnetic radiation diffraction techniques. The maximum observed isotope effect in LDA ice is [?] 3.4% at 40 K when compared to the magnitude of the first peak in the electronic structure factor at Q = 1.70 A[?]1. This compares to a maximum effect of [?] 1.6% previously measured in liquid water at room temperature (Tomberli et al 2000 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter. 12 2597). The isotope effect is shown to be similar to a temperature shift in the structure of light LDA ice. However, the existence of a first sharp diffraction peak at Q = 1.0 A[?]1 in the isotopic difference function is not reproduced in the temperature difference and suggests that additional longer-range correlations are present in the more ordered deuterated form.
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AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
Identifier10451456
NPARC number12338205
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Record identifierf68662c8-0ee5-4887-b756-b737e624e34f
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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