Functional characterization of amyrin synthase involved in ursolic acid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus leaf epidermis

Download
  1. (PDF, 597 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: Functional characterization of amyrin synthase involved in ursolic acid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus leaf epidermis (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.phytochem.2012.05.002
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titlePhytochemistry
Pages# of pages: 6
SubjectCatharanthus amyrin synthase; Leaf epidermis expression; Ursolic acid; Secretion
AbstractCatharanthus roseus accumulates high levels of the pentacyclic triterpene, ursolic acid, as a component of its wax exudate on the leaf surface. Bioinformatic analyses of transcripts derived from the leaf epidermis provide evidence for the specialized role of this tissue in the biosynthesis of ursolic acid. Cloning and functional expression in yeast of a triterpene synthase derived from this tissue showed it to be predominantly an α-amyrin synthase (CrAS), since the α-amyrin to β-amyrin reaction products accumulated in a 5:1 ratio. Expression analysis of CrAS showed that triterpene biosynthesis occurs predominantly in the youngest leaf tissues and in the earliest stages of seedling development. Further studies using laser capture microdissection to harvest RNA from epidermis, mesophyll, idioblasts, laticifers and vasculature of leaves showed the leaf epidermis to be the preferred sites of CrAS expression and provide conclusive evidence for the involvement of this tissue in the biosynthesis of ursolic acid in C. roseus.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Plant Biotechnology Institute
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number54668
NPARC number21186088
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierf6d7cd02-ef0f-45dc-bdf5-7b7588641fb1
Record created2013-01-09
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)